The Son-Rise Program (Options)

“The Son-Rise Method (sometimes known as the Options Method) is a type of relationship-based intervention. It is used to help children on the autism spectrum and children with other disabilities.
The Son-Rise Method is based on the idea that children on the autism spectrum have trouble forming relationships with other people but can be helped to meet develop those relationships through playful interaction with an adult.
The adult follows the child's lead rather than superimposing her own ideas of what the child should do. This includes 'joining' the child in his behaviour rather than trying to stop it. So, if the child is stacking blocks or flapping his hands, the adult does the same.
The aim is not simply to copy the activity but to build trust.” This information is from the following official website: http://researchautism.net/autism-interventions/types/behavioural-and-developmental/relationship-based/son-rise-program-and-autism

At Uffculme we use elements and principles of the Son-Rise programme as follows:

At Uffculme it takes the form of Intensive Interaction type of interactive engagement. The ‘hard to reach’ child, in particular, is receptive to this approach. These sessions may be of very short duration e.g. for a brief period in the playground. We copy the child’s actions or vocalisations, add to them once we have a rapport and eventually encourage the child to copy us, but without any pressure to do so.
Whilst these interactions are valuable and enjoyable and create a mutual rapport, we believe it is important that pupils learn to accept direction and to comply with requests to complete activities.

People with ASD are often restricted in their choice of activities and are reluctant to try new things as this may induce a state of anxiety. We carefully plan new experiences and model tasks and activities to overcome any reluctance and never force a child to carry out tasks of which they appear fearful. We select new activities which are akin to preferred activities e.g. if liking pop-up toys we may try a ‘click clack track’ type of ‘marble run’. In our experience, pupils usually come to enjoy new activities once they have become familiar with them. Unless they had been introduced to these activities they may never have chosen to explore them. Pupils are thus guided to gain a wider understanding of their environment and are more likely to further develop their social understanding and skills.

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Uffculme School is closed to students and staff on Monday 11th December due to adverse weather conditions